June 15, 2015

THE YEAR OF ST. VINCENT

2014 was a massive year for St. Vincent — the talented multi-instrumentalist got signed to Republic Records (Lorde, Amy Winehouse), released her self-titled album to some hefty critical acclaim, subsequently won her first Grammy for Best Alternative Album, and landed a spot opening for The Black Keys on their North American tour in addition to her own headline shows. With all that being said, it doesn’t look like things are going to be slowing down in 2015.

Annie Clark (AKA St. Vincent) actually began her career by playing in the touring band for Sufjan Stevens before forming her own band in 2006. She released three albums: Marry Me (2007), followed by Actor (2009) and Strange Mercy (2011) — but it is, rather fittingly, her recent self-titled release that has put St. Vincent’s name on the map. Not only did it win Clark her first Grammy, making her only the second female solo artist to win the ‘Best Alt Album’ award since its inception in 1991, but it was listed in the top 5 for ‘Best Albums of 2014’ by various publications, including NME, Guardian, Entertainment Weekly, and Rolling Stone.

Now, St. Vincent has a pretty extensive tour lined up for the remainder of the year. Her current tour spans all across Europe and North America, and includes stops at both the inaugural WayHome Festival and Montreal’s Osheaga. Next week, St. Vincent will be joining an all-star lineup of musicians in Toronto for David Byrne’s ‘Contemporary Colour’, which will see ten color guard teams perform live alongside an all-star cast of musicians that also include tUnE-yArDs, How to Dress Well, Dev Hynes, Kelis, Nelly Furtardo, and Byrne himself at The Air Canada Centre (June 22 & 23).

Check out St. Vincent’s video for her 2014 single “Digital Witness” below:

#indiepop

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